Recipe: Mulled Wine

Mulled wine originated in the 2nd century as a way to keep the Romans warm during cold winters. As the Roman empire spread across Europe, so did the popularity of mulled wine. Europeans would mix their wine with spices to promote health and avoid sickness and add herbs and flowers to make unpalatable wine taste better. Nowadays, the beverage is often associated with the holidays and is enjoyed across the world under a variety of names, including Glühwein in Germany and Glögg in Sweden.  Continue reading “Recipe: Mulled Wine”

Woburn Abbey Scone Recipe

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The Victorians were masters of making the most out of difficult circumstances. Let’s follow suit. It may be bitterly cold and the sun may be masked by the winter drear, but never has a hot cup of tea and a scone been more enjoyable (or perhaps more fitting) than on such days. This recipe is a tried and true classic, hailing from Woburn Abbey in Buckinghamshire, UK. It has been adapted from A Treasury of Great Recipes by Mary & Vincent Prince and will hopefully bring a bit of warmth to heart and home on a blustery winter’s day. Continue reading “Woburn Abbey Scone Recipe”

A Day for Yorkshire Pudding

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National Yorkshire Pudding Day is upon us! The first published recipe for “Yorkshire Pudding” hails from Northern England and dates back to 1747 with Hannah Glasse’s bestselling cookbook, “The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy.”  In those days, Yorkshire pudding was served as an appetizer course for roast dinners. Meat was expensive, and so every bit of it was utilized. The pudding was cooked beneath the roasting meat so as to sop up those delicious drippings, an essential source of fat in the working class diet.  Leftover pudding found its way to the next-day breakfast table, dressed with syrup or jam. Since its origins, Yorkshire pudding has been adapted into various traditional British recipes. “Toad in the Hole” is a Yorkshire pudding stuffed with sausage and doused in onion gravy. And the batter for Yorkshire pudding also yields a lovely pancake. This 18th century staple begs to accompany your next harvest stew or Sunday pot roast. Continue reading “A Day for Yorkshire Pudding”

The Scoop on the Ice Cream Cone

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The ice cream cone made its debut on July 23rd, 1904 at the St. Louis World’s Fair and quickly became a national sensation. Then called a “cornucopia,” the first ice cream cone was made from a thin, rolled waffle baked to a crisp and filled with two scoops of ice cream. While the public origin of the ice cream cone is certainly the St. Louis World’s Fair, the details of its invention remain a mystery. Several confectioners sold ice cream cones that day in 1904, and each claimed credit for the tasty innovation. Now a favorite mainstay of sultry  summer afternoons, the ice cream cone turns 111 years old today. Shall we celebrate with a scoop?

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