The Tale of Rose Red

Since long ago in a far away land, roses symbolized passion, kindness, and love.

Being so, it is no wonder two sisters were named after such a flower. Snow White embodied sympathy. A gentle young child, she enjoyed the indoors and assisting their mother with tasks. Complementing her sister, Rose Red cherished prancing about in the fields and playing in the forest.

They were the best of friends, often hand in hand.

Perhaps ’twas the warmth of their love and not the fire that drew a hulking bear to the cottage door.

The Heart of English Gardens

The expanse of a manicured lawn rolled out as a carpet to Hampton Court.

Lancelot Brown attempted to share his vision of the property. How could he quite explain to Hannah Moore?

“‘Now there’ said he, pointing his finger, ‘I make a comma, and there’ pointing to another spot, ‘where a more decided turn is proper, I make a colon; at another part, where an interruption is desirable to break the view, a parenthesis; now a full stop, and then I begin another subject'”, Moore captured their exchange.

Bad Boys of the Victorian Era

Gentlemen on the streets. Rapscallions in the sheets.

True to form, what is seen isn’t always the most honest portrayal of conduct. These charlatans, these men of passion, enchanted ladies of their time. Poet Lord Byron fashioned  She Walks in Beauty. Similarly, artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti committed the loveliness of his muses to canvas.

But what of those bad boys who were more than mere playboys. . ? 

We’re glad you asked.

Oh No They Didn’t: Victorian Scandals

In true fashion of the era, Victorian scandals were as prim as they were preposterous.

The Queen was no exception.

Her reign nearly ended before it began thanks to an accusation. No doubt a ploy to discredit Sir John Conroy, Victoria made veiled accusations targeting a lady-in-waiting who’d recently presented a swollen abdomen. . . and had been most recently traveling alone with the manipulative controller.

Adamant of her purity, Lady Flora Hastings humbled herself to the court’s suspicions and, to her great humiliation, submitted to an examination by the royal doctor.

Her diagnosis of liver disease proved Lady Hastings was, in fact, not with child. Further, it confirmed to Queen Victoria’s adversaries that she still was one.

The “baby” scandal wasn’t the only plot that backfired. . .

Treasured Victorian Easter Traditions

To tell of Easter is to speak of hope.

As well it should be. For the holiday celebrates a promise of new life and the resurrection of one—that of Jesus Christ. His story unfolds from each pulpit on Easter Sunday, but also the days leading up.

The Thursday before hosts what’s known in England as the Royal Maundy. Each sovereign tailors the event in some way. During Queen Victoria’s reign, she determined the event be held at Westminster Abbey.  It is there that she addressed the congregation and upheld the tradition of distributing something much more precious than candy. . .

A Tale Of The Cottingley Fairies

The photographs were black and white. However, the subject was gray in its entirety.

How could two cousins of nine and sixteen procure evidence of pixies when no other had afore? With a borrowed camera, Frances Griffiths and Elsie Wright presented five most compelling pictures of fairies at Cottingley brook. Of course, their summer (1917) antics couldn’t stay merely between them.