25 Victorian Love Quotes To Make You Swoon

Love was in the era.

It was a period of grand gestures. There, the etiquette of flirtation was cultivated and scandalously abandoned.

Romance lived on the pages of love letters from Prince Albert to the chapters of timeless novels by the Brontë sisters. Their words still elicit excitement, reflection, joy, hope, and love.

Without further ado, here are twenty-five Victorian love quotes to steal your breath away. . .

The Art Of Matchmaking: Truths Every Matchmaker Knows

Many a fantasy has stripped reality of charm.

Such is the case with matchmaking Emma Woodhouse. Her expectations in the way of romance leaves her thoroughly disenchanted. The couple she carefully orchestrated fall away in strife. So burdened was she by these defeats that in Chapter 16 she claims, “It was wrong, to take so active a part in bringing any two people together.”

Had Emma taken to heart these matchmaking truths, she and her matches would have faired far better.

This final installment lends insight to unassuming lies on may believe when bringing good people together.

The Art of Matchmaking: Dos & Don’ts

Emma Woodhouse repeatedly mismatched.

In fact, she arguably has few — if any —successful relationships to her credit. Still, she is worthy of analysis. For whose failures better to learn from than a heroine of sincere heart and unprecedented ambition?

This installment shares dos and don’ts to abide by in the art of matchmaking.

From A to V: The Complete Guide to a Marriage like Albert & Victoria’s

Victoria had her doubts.

Marry Albert? She supposed it had always been in the future, something their families alluded. Now, there was pressure to wed. More particularly, there was pressure to wed Albert. 

She wrote to her Uncle Leopold.

Though all the reports of Albert are most favourable, and though I have little doubt I shall like him, still one can never answer beforehand for feelings, and I may not have the feeling for him which is requisite to ensure happiness. I may like him as a friend, and as a cousin and as a brother, but no more. 

Of course, more came. And with it, one of the most remarkable marriages history has come to know.

The Art of Matchmaking: How To Make a Match

Mr. Weston would never marry again.

Pish posh!

Emma had witnessed a fondness between him and Miss Taylor ever since the day their paths crossed on Broadway-lane. Upon returning from their wedding, Emma boasts to her father and Mr. Knightley of how she “planned the match from that hour.”

“Where is your merit?” Mr. Knightley asks. “What are you proud of? You made a lucky guess; and that is all that can be said.”

“A lucky guess is never merely luck. There is always some talent in it. If I had not promoted Mr. Weston’s visits here, and given many little encouragements, and smoothed many little matters, it might not have come to any thing after all.”

This installment of The Art of Matchmaking provides a guide to the talent of how to make a match.