Woburn Abbey Scone Recipe

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The Victorians were masters of making the most out of difficult circumstances. Let’s follow suit. It may be bitterly cold and the sun may be masked by the winter drear, but never has a hot cup of tea and a scone been more enjoyable (or perhaps more fitting) than on such days. This recipe is a tried and true classic, hailing from Woburn Abbey in Buckinghamshire, UK. It has been adapted from A Treasury of Great Recipes by Mary & Vincent Prince and will hopefully bring a bit of warmth to heart and home on a blustery winter’s day. Continue reading “Woburn Abbey Scone Recipe”

A Day for Yorkshire Pudding

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National Yorkshire Pudding Day is upon us! The first published recipe for “Yorkshire Pudding” hails from Northern England and dates back to 1747 with Hannah Glasse’s bestselling cookbook, “The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy.”  In those days, Yorkshire pudding was served as an appetizer course for roast dinners. Meat was expensive, and so every bit of it was utilized. The pudding was cooked beneath the roasting meat so as to sop up those delicious drippings, an essential source of fat in the working class diet.  Leftover pudding found its way to the next-day breakfast table, dressed with syrup or jam. Since its origins, Yorkshire pudding has been adapted into various traditional British recipes. “Toad in the Hole” is a Yorkshire pudding stuffed with sausage and doused in onion gravy. And the batter for Yorkshire pudding also yields a lovely pancake. This 18th century staple begs to accompany your next harvest stew or Sunday pot roast. Continue reading “A Day for Yorkshire Pudding”

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