How To Decorate Your Home Like A True Victorian

It was lavish or nothing at all.

Interior design of the Victorian Era required grandeur. An ambition to which they reached through displaying each and every furnishing. Opulence began in the rug design to the fringed valance.

It was lavish or nothing at all.

Interior design of the Victorian Era required grandeur. An ambition to which they reached through displaying each and every furnishing. Opulence began in the rug design to the fringed valance.

Discover how to incorporate 19th century home decor in your home.

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Strange Victorian Occupations for Women

They were wives, yes. They were mothers.

But Victorian women accomplished a great deal more than marriage and offspring. The most expensive Fabergé Imperial Egg was created by a 25-year-old female employee named Alma Pihl. Ada Lovelace created the world’s first computer program. Of course, Victoria was the Queen of England and Empress of India.

Not all professions were quite so glamorous. A myriad of strange occupations came to be in the Victorian Era. Why, you could even find employment in delivering meat to cats!

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Bad Boys of the Victorian Era

Which historical heartbreaker wrote his girlfriend that he’d died?

Gentlemen on the streets. Rapscallions in the sheets.

True to form, what is seen isn’t always the most honest portrayal of conduct. These charlatans, these men of passion, enchanted ladies of their time. Poet Lord Byron fashioned  She Walks in Beauty. Similarly, artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti committed the loveliness of his muses to canvas.

But what of those bad boys who were more than mere playboys. . ? 

We’re glad you asked.

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Oh No They Didn’t: Victorian Scandals

In true fashion of the era, Victorian scandals were as prim as they were preposterous.

In true fashion of the era, Victorian scandals were as prim as they were preposterous.

The Queen was no exception.

Her reign nearly ended before it began thanks to an accusation. No doubt a ploy to discredit Sir John Conroy, Victoria made veiled accusations targeting a lady-in-waiting who’d recently presented a swollen abdomen. . . and had been most recently traveling alone with the manipulative controller.

Adamant of her purity, Lady Flora Hastings humbled herself to the court’s suspicions and, to her great humiliation, submitted to an examination by the royal doctor.

Her diagnosis of liver disease proved Lady Hastings was, in fact, not with child. Further, it confirmed to Queen Victoria’s adversaries that she still was one.

The “baby” scandal wasn’t the only plot that backfired. . .

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Treasured Victorian Easter Traditions

From Maundy coins to sugar eggs, have you knowledge of these treasured Victorian Easter traditions?

To tell of Easter is to speak of hope.

As well it should be. For the holiday celebrates a promise of new life and the resurrection of one—that of Jesus Christ. His story unfolds from each pulpit on Easter Sunday, but also the days leading up.

The Thursday before hosts what’s known in England as the Royal Maundy. Each sovereign tailors the event in some way. During Queen Victoria’s reign, she determined the event be held at Westminster Abbey.  It is there that she addressed the congregation and upheld the tradition of distributing something much more precious than candy. . .

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How Scrooge Sparked Christmas & More Yuletide Origins

You know Dasher & Dancer & Prancer & Vixen. But do you know where these yuletide traditions originated?

‘Twas a time before Christmas.

Unimaginable as it may seem, the holiday brought little more than a glad tiding or cup of good cheer. To unearth the origins of time-honored traditions held today requires a return to  Victorian Christmases.

. . . To precisely one in particular. . . that of Ebenezer Scrooge.

A little Christmas book.

Selling out in three days’ time, Charles Dicken’s “little Christmas book” became a classic straightaway. Of a myriad of Things You Might Not Know About A Christmas Carol, its message of giving fostered convictions in the rich and inspired the classes from merely observing the holiday to celebrating it.

Speaking of old Ebenezer. . . .

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