BRING THAT BACK: LOCKETS & PERFUME BUTTONS

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As our previous post about Buckle Jewelry touched on, the Victorians were a sentimental lot. They were accustomed to losing loved ones to disease, workplace accidents, and war, and so they built a culture that helped them to cope with these losses.

In addition to buckle jewelry, lockets and perfume buttons were worn in remembrance of a departed loved one. Or in the case of wartime, they were exchanged between a soldier and his long-distant sweetheart, as a token of fidelity and reassurance during indefinite periods apart. Continue reading “BRING THAT BACK: LOCKETS & PERFUME BUTTONS”

Bring That Back: Victorian Buckle Jewelry

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Bring That Back: Victorian Buckle Jewelry


As All Souls Day draws nigh, it seems fitting to shed light on the Victorians’ rich tradition of remembrance. In a time when one’s grasp on life was especially tenuous, mortality was keenly felt. Husbands lost their wives to childbirth, parents lost their infants to infection, women lost their men to the dangers of the industrial workplace. In the wake of such ubiquitous loss, the Victorians clung to a number of mourning traditions, which granted solace through remembrance. Postmortem photography, hairwreaths and jewelry made from the locks of departed loved ones, and the customary donning of black were all ways in which the Victorians honored, mourned, and coped with the loss of their dead.

Perhaps a more subtle mourning custom was the wearing of buckle jewelry. By its very form, the buckled belt suggests the never-ending circle of eternity. For the Victorians, it embodied a sentiment of enduring love and loyalty that transcended the grave. It was a gesture of devotion that adorned bracelets, rings, brooches, and lockets, many of which were personalized with a concealed lock of hair or an engraving of the deceased’s initials and death date.

Victorian-style buckle jewelry is timeless in its beauty and appeal, but the powerful sentiment behind its origins makes this tradition all the worthier of preservation.

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Photo Credits:
Bracelets: http://www.langantiques.com/products/item/40-1-105
Ring: https://www.etsy.com/listing/98424401/antique-buckle-ring-18k-yellow-gold?ref=market

Shade on a Stick

parasol beauty

The lace canopy that shields from torrents and sunbeams possesses a history that spans the centuries back to the East Indies 5000 years past. But the French popularized the hand-held accessory during the reign of King Louis XIV when couturiers would fabricate lavishly trimmed parasols to match splendid gowns. Continue reading “Shade on a Stick”

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